Features

iStockphoto, a provider of royalty free stock photography, pioneered a micropayment model to bring affordable stock photographs to the masses and shook up the stock photo industry in the process. Now, following its acquisition by Getty Images earlier this year, iStockphoto is leveraging its parent company’s expertise to add video clips and broaden the site’s international appeal.
By - October 2006 Issue, Posted Sep 20, 2006
In order to support the emerging needs of its clients and meet the expanding definition of search, ISYS Search Software has introduced the latest version of its flagship suite.
By - October 2006 Issue, Posted Sep 18, 2006
Comparing the costs of different doctors and medical procedures can be a time-consuming affair for consumers but a number of digital initiatives have emerged that will help provide consumers with more information to medical data. Yet more access means more risk for consumers and providers alike.
By - September 2006 Issue, Posted Sep 12, 2006
In the wake of July’s click-fraud settlement, experts are speculating on its effects on web advertising and on how the industry can prevent click fraud in the first place.
By - October 2006 Issue, Posted Sep 11, 2006
For companies with thousands of employees, resetting forgotten or compromised passwords and replacing key cards is not only irritating, it is a downright costly and risky proposition. In terms of data security, biometrics offers a solution that makes passwords obsolete and keys a thing of the past. Lose your keys? Never again . . . because you are your keys.
By - September 2006 Issue, Posted Sep 05, 2006
Anticipation grows as the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) prepares for one of its most significant meetings, to be held in Marrakech, Morocco. The meeting will cover aspects of the ongoing heated debate over the September 30, 2006 expiration of the Memorandum of Understanding with the United States. Pressure builds as the international community favors that the authority of ICANN be relinquished to an international organization such as the United Nations for the purpose of adding diverse flavor to the corporation.
By - September 2006 Issue, Posted Sep 01, 2006
The concept of “net neutrality” sounds quite reasonable in theory, but the policy proposals coming from federal legislators and bureaucrats may in reality be quite discriminatory.
By - September 2006 Issue, Posted Aug 31, 2006
RSS, or Really Simple Syndication, provides an outlet for publishers to distribute their content to a wide audience without worrying about email subscriptions or spam filters. Unfortunately, RSS may well have made it easier for unscrupulous website owners to steal content.
By - September 2006 Issue, Posted Aug 29, 2006
If you’re reading EContent, no one needs to tell you what an important medium the internet has become for delivering content and reaching consumers across the world. But, according to a June 2006 study conducted on behalf of the Online Publishers Association (OPA) by the Center for Media Design at Ball State University, advertising dollars aren’t keeping up with skyrocketing consumer web demand.
By - September 2006 Issue, Posted Aug 28, 2006
To many, the word bibliography sounds about as pleasant as nails on a blackboard, calling to mind unpleasant recollections of last-minute, late-night research reports: After burning the midnight oil completing a scholastic epic, you still face the daunting task of sifting through mountains of research materials, then citing sources—including book title, author, publisher, copyright date, and page numbers. Luckily, there are those hard at work trying to make at least the citation part of this familiar academic drama fade into distant memory.
By - September 2006 Issue, Posted Aug 24, 2006
Controversy trails Google Book Search wherever it goes. The latest bout of trouble comes from France. La Martinière Groupe, an international French publisher, filed a suit in early June against both Google, Inc. and Google France on behalf of three of its publishing houses, Le Seuil (France), Delachaux et Niestlé (Switzerland), and Abrams (The United States). La Martinière claims Google has disregarded intellectual property rights and has produced counterfeits of its books on the Book Search site.
By - September 2006 Issue, Posted Aug 18, 2006
Whether by acquisition, merger, or the expanding global marketplace, more and more companies find themselves handling content in multiple languages. Managing multilingual content adds (at least) a layer of complexity to the overall content management process. Fortunately, there are systems available that involve both CMS vendors and translation service providers to bring the process under control.
By - July/August 2006 Issue, Posted Jul 25, 2006
Though the term portal remains a broadly misused word, enterprise IT leaders consistently rank portal technology near the top of their investment plans. So it’s no surprise that open source portal projects are trying to claim their share of the buzz.
By , - July/August 2006 Issue, Posted Jul 18, 2006
Content creators and users alike leverage tracking tools to help determine how content is being used. Accurate tracking allows content to be delivered in more meaningful contexts for users and advertisers, and can make a significant impact on the bottom line.
By - July/August 2006 Issue, Posted Jul 11, 2006
Look closely at your cell phone. Watch out! It might be looking right back at you, sending information about your location to a map, where you will join other people in your town as dynamic parts of a real-time geophysical landscape. Cell phones like these are drawing the map of the future, according to the research team behind the SENSEable City Lab.
By - July/August 2006 Issue, Posted Jul 11, 2006
Can’t wait for the kettle to boil? Frantically pushing elevator buttons in a futile attempt to make it come a bit faster? Well, Amazon’s Upgrade was made for you. In May, Amazon announced Upgrade, which gives users immediate online access to the entire text of a purchased book at a fee of an additional 10%–20% above a book’s list price. It also enables customers to search, annotate, bookmark, and print individual pages, leveraging digital functionality to enhance the book buyer’s experience. Amazon Upgrade is built on the same technology as its “Search Inside the Book” program launched three years ago.
By - July/August 2006 Issue, Posted Jul 07, 2006
Copyright is not user-friendly. In fact, copyright issues are so complex it is hardly friendly to publishers or lawyers either. The complexity of copyright presents such a high hurdle that most users don’t even try to decipher its vagaries and just hit the Send button and hope for the best. Even those who personally want to adhere to copyright or whose organizations mandate it often find the process of clearing rights so daunting that it hardly seems worth it, thus inhibiting their ability to share valuable resources. In an effor to clarify the process, CCC has introduced Rightsphere, which provides “an instant, unambiguous answer to the user’s question, ‘What am I allowed to do with this content?’”
By - July/August 2006 Issue, Posted Jun 23, 2006
While Government regulation of communication may seem like a crystal-clear area of the law, the internet has kicked up a whole lot of static. The demand for anytime, anywhere internet access has gone sky-high. In June, the FCC auctioned off frequencies for in-flight wireless internet access on all domestic flights.
By - July/August 2006 Issue, Posted Jun 22, 2006
These days, Tim Berners-Lee’s dictum, “If it’s not on the Web, it doesn’t exist,” may need to be supplemented with, “And if your business is not creating XML content, it may soon cease to exist.” Here we take an extensive look at many of the popular XML content-creation tools on the market to help you navigate the power and potential of XML.
By - June 2006 Issue, Posted Jun 13, 2006
Parents are between a rock and a hard place: they want to encourage their children to be creative individuals—and blogging offers an excellent opportunity to learn to express thoughts and feelings—however, they must balance this against the risk of exposure to Internet predators. Jeanette Symons, founder of San Francisco Bay Area-based Industrious Kid, thinks blogging is worth the risk, but believes that risk can be mitigated by limiting social networking to a familiar community. She put $6 million from private investments into development of imbee.com, a blogging site for children ages 8 to 14 years olds.
By - June 2006 Issue, Posted Jun 12, 2006
PTC has launched its enhanced Windchill 8.0 content management system, which features integration with Arbortext XML authoring software. PTC, a Product Lifecycle Management and Enterprise Content Management solutions provider, acquired Arbortext in July of last year, and PTC developers have worked to leverage the synergies between the two companies to provide an integrated PLM content management and publishing system.
By - June 2006 Issue, Posted Jun 06, 2006
New, global software standards are emerging for the publishing industry, promising to allow content to do more and make more. However, many publishers are hesitant to embrace these standards despite the potential they offer in easing workflow and enabling content reuse.
By - June 2006 Issue, Posted Jun 01, 2006
A judgment entered in December against bloggers, alleging that they illicitly disclosed trade secrets from Apple Computer, Inc., online, may have free speech implications for all online publishers. “This is not the usual, run-of-the-mill trade secrets case,” according to Karna Berg, an intellectual property attorney with Halleland Lewis Nilan & Johnson, in reference to Apple v. Does. The case is now on appeal with the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), the online civil rights group handling the defense.
By - June 2006 Issue, Posted May 24, 2006
While enterprise search technology has been capable of searching multiple repositories for some time, it required a great deal of programming overhead and didn’t necessarily allow users to manipulate the results. XML and other Web Services have changed all that, enabling more effectual search results.
By - June 2006 Issue, Posted May 23, 2006
Thomas Edison conceptualized the moving picture more than a century ago. Since then “we’ve been refining . . . but not innovating it,” according to FrameFree Technologies president Tom Randolph. FrameFree Technologies plans to pick up where Edison left off with its May 15, 2006, launch of FrameFree Studio, digital imaging software that Randolph hopes will set new standards for ease of use, picture quality, and even bring motion to still images.
By - June 2006 Issue, Posted May 16, 2006
Basis Technology recently announced an initiative to create the next generation of digital forensics products. Basis Technology specializes in multilingual information retrieval, focusing on the problem of searching, sorting, classifying, and organizing information in many different languages. The company’s clients include Google, Microsoft, MSN Search, Yahoo!, AOL, and numerous others.
By - May 2006 Issue, Posted May 16, 2006
The infiltration of online communications technologies into the corporate training space has resulted in a new subset of elearning that promises quick, easy, and rich learning at lower costs. Now you don’t have to be rich (in money or technical skills) to create or benefit from rich learning.
By - May 2006 Issue, Posted May 09, 2006
As digital asset collections grow, it becomes increasingly important to build a digital asset management system (DAM) with strong classification, taxonomy, and search components to help you locate an asset whenever you need it. Yet digital assets present a unique search problem, requiring a strategy all its own.
By - May 2006 Issue, Posted May 02, 2006
Most companies start small, hoping to attract a bigger clientele as they grow. ClearStory is trying a different approach with its recent launch of ActiveMedia Essentials, a hosted, browser-based digital assets management package that targets smaller companies and departments that want to manage their digital media assets with the same security and usability that the major companies have come to expect from ClearStory’s ActiveMedia Enterprise software.
By - May 2006 Issue, Posted May 02, 2006
Baffled by the difference between .3gp, .3gp2, .avi, .dv, .mpg, .mpg4, .mov .mqv, .wmv, .asf? Hung up on how to upload these pesky digital video formats into your business Web site, blog, eBay account, or online store? Unsure whether your format plays nice with your customers’ preferred players? Well, the mystifying business of publishing digital video content online just got a whole lot easier.
By - May 2006 Issue, Posted May 01, 2006
The French minister of culture, Renaud Donnedieu de Vabres, has a growing controversy on his hands: the DADVSI law on copyright in the digital age. The most contentious aspect of the DADVSI law is the attempt to curb illegal downloading of music and movies via P2P programs through the use of Digital Rights Management (DRM). This has caused uproar amo486ng the Internet-using public and divided the governing political party representatives in the national assembly.
By - May 2006 Issue, Posted Apr 25, 2006
The recent proliferation of blogs and other “consumer-generated media” has had a major impact on our culture—affecting the way we get our news, entertain ourselves, and especially the way we do business. These days, smart companies need to equip themselves to track their corporate image online.
By - May 2006 Issue, Posted Apr 25, 2006
“The next generation was born digital,” according R.J. Pittman, CEO, president, director, and co-founder of Groxis, Inc., who gave the opening keynote at the 2006 annual NFAIS Conference in Philadelphia. The “next generation,” he describes, was raised communicating through cell phone, either voice or text messaging.
By - May 2006 Issue, Posted Apr 21, 2006
Information-security problems caused by metadata, like the Pentagon fiasco from last spring, are becoming a pressing issue for the government and many corporations, are concerned that may transform the way information is shared online. The National Security Agency (NSA)—charged with protecting U.S. government information systems and producing foreign signals intelligence
By - April 2006 Issue, Posted Apr 13, 2006
The “badware” problem—the plague of viruses, Trojan horses, worms, spyware, adware, and similar applications that hurt business and consumers alike—has become so pervasive that three major technology companies, two universities, and a consumer’s watchdog group have banded together in an attempt to deter these malicious software programs.
By - April 2006 Issue, Posted Apr 10, 2006
You can’t live forever, but thanks to a StoryBooth coming to a town near you, you might be able to live on in digital form (and even tell your grandkids what life was like before the Internet, though they might not believe you). StoryCorps, a national project designed to inspire people to record others’ stories, was formed to make digital recording accessible to the general public.
By - April 2006 Issue, Posted Apr 07, 2006
Welcome to an on-demand nation, an emerging Web where users don’t just demand content, they also define its value in unanticipated ways. From the simplest of Web Services, RSS, to advanced database publishing and even APIs that let users drill into your content repository, the emerging service orientation model argues that users not only provide the demand for content but also provide its value.
By - April 2006 Issue, Posted Apr 07, 2006
In an age when whole lives are lived online, people not only create content, they're building their own infrastructure for making it easier to find. The term folksonomy was coined to name the growing phenomenon of users generating metadata by tagging pieces of digital information with their own searchable keywords, a phenomenon picking up steam all over the Web.
By - April 2006 Issue, Posted Apr 03, 2006
For years, the ebook industry has been trying to bring ebooks into the mainstream, but hardware issues with the reader devices have held back widespread adoption. This could change this year when Sony debuts its reader featuring E Ink screen technology this Spring.
By - April 2006 Issue, Posted Mar 28, 2006
Rich Internet Applications increasingly provide access to applications of all sorts—from email to mission-critical ones—via Web interfaces. This article takes a look at the burgeoning Rich Internet Application (RIA) space and explores some of the reasons for its growing popularity.
By - April 2006 Issue, Posted Mar 27, 2006
With each emerging content type comes the ever-present need to help users find it. While text-based search has continued to evolve, effective tools for rich media are still nascent. For the Web’s hot content-type du jour, podcasting, search tools have only just started to appear, though this search niche is poised to heat up: Forrester Research predicts that 12.3 million U.S. households will listen to podcasts by decade’s end; the Diffusion Group estimates the U.S. podcast audience will be at 56 million by 2010.
By - March 2006 Issue, Posted Mar 16, 2006
Users taking control was the theme of this year’s Software Information Industry Association’s (SIIA) Summit held in New York City January 31 and February 1, 2006. However, another underlying current flowed through the event: a shift in the business model to leverage the appeal of free content.
By - April 2006 Issue, Posted Mar 15, 2006
DAM has experienced slower-than-expected growth, in part because of the perception that DAM limits access, rather than the reality—that it expands access. Effective strategies for implementing and using DAM are emerging, particularly in various vertical markets. Within verticals—regardless of differing needs and challenges—the demand for simplified, universal access drives adoption.
By - March 2006 Issue, Posted Mar 15, 2006
Promising to free users from the bondage of PCs and clunky headsets, Skype is bringing its signature voice over IP (VoIP) services—which let individuals and companies make cheap or free phone calls over the Internet—to the mobile space. To this end, Skype has teamed up with Netgear, a provider of networking products, to develop a family of new products, including the world’s first Skype wireless mobile phone.
By - March 2006 Issue, Posted Mar 09, 2006
In its earliest incarnation, elearning was viewed by businesses as a tool to provide basic education to employees, many of whom no longer occupied desks at the office. These days, however, executives expect elearning to do much more, including provide a potent way to help drive sales by leveraging it to educate every member of the value chain.
By - March 2006 Issue, Posted Mar 08, 2006
Long the bane of your inbox, spam has come to a blog near you. You may have already encountered a spam blog, though they often look exactly like the real thing: there’s an area at the end of each “post” for Comments, an Archived Blog section by month, a Recent Posts section, and some even include a BlogRoll so you can see who has viewed the blog. But that’s where the similarity to real blogs ends. The spam-esque content bears little resemblance to the insightful, edgy commentary associated with popular blogs. Spam blogs—or splogs—are comprised of the all-too-familiar content of spam email: porn links, mortgage offers, and drugs for sale.
By - March 2006 Issue, Posted Mar 03, 2006
Google co-founder Larry Page’s much ballyhooed unveiling of the Google Video Store made official the company’s plan to launch a video content marketplace. The announcement came in January at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas where über-geek Page’s keynote was punctuated by onstage banter with comedian Robin Williams and two-time NBA champion Kenny Smith. It wasn’t all fun and games though; Page’s announcement is big news for video content providers and consumers alike.
By - March 2006 Issue, Posted Mar 01, 2006
Now that we’re more than a decade into the widespread use of email, the platform may not be in crisis so much as awash in mid-life ennui, suffering from middle-age spread and lacking the motivation to fix itself. The real answer may lie in learning to go with, rather than curtail, the flow.
By - March 2006 Issue, Posted Mar 01, 2006
Think you are giving customers what they want? Not if they have to navigate through multiple menus and sift through search results to find it. And what if the customer isn’t entirely sure what she needs in the first place? If companies want to connect users with content, then they need to remove the pain from the discovery process and provide users with what they want—perhaps even before they know they need it.
By - January/February 2006 Issue, Posted Jan 20, 2006
A report from the Cutter Consortium, an IT advisory firm, says that the U.S. Patent Office should carefully re-examine its rules and regulations regarding software patents. Cutter believes the U.S. software patent scheme is “badly broken” and that, in light of the European Union’s ruling not to grant patents on software, it is time for the U.S. to give serious thought to revamping its patent system.
By - January/February 2006 Issue, Posted Jan 20, 2006
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