Features

In the Old Economy, those who owned the exclusive rights to a product or service could become very wealthy. Today the tables have turned; it’s openness and the free availability of good ideas that drive value. The mindset of not only the content consumer is shifting, but also that of vendors and even content providers, which seek to find ways to profit from the new (digital) economy. peggy anne salz
By - June 2005 Issue, Posted Jun 15, 2005
The open access (OA) landscape is littered with misconceptions and misunderstandings. In fact, the very definition of open access is frequently disputed. There are those who assume that anything free is open access and others who confuse it with kindred spirit open source, but understanding the definition is only to begin to grasp the issues OA raises. Marydee ojala
By - June 2005 Issue, Posted Jun 14, 2005
When Ourmedia.org launched this past March, it provided a free space for creators of all types of content—including video, audio, and the written word—to distribute their content. Perhaps more importantly, however, it stepped in to fill an emerging need for a forum in which to discuss the best ways to create, produce, and distribute content.
By - June 2005 Issue, Posted Jun 09, 2005
People already create, distribute, and consume mobile information and entertainment in the forms of news, music, and games; now art has gone mobile too. Several organizations are harnessing mobile technology to bring art to the masses and to provide artists with new outlets and creative forms.
By - June 2005 Issue, Posted Jun 09, 2005
Citizen Journalism provides a place for people to celebrate the ordinary victories in their lives, a forum for discussing local political issues, coverage that specifically suits its local readership, and a way to connect people to one another—all things found wanting in a world dominated by big media monopolies. This budding phenomenon supports the community along with a new journalistic business model. Ron miller
By - June 2005 Issue, Posted Jun 07, 2005
New Yorkers always look like they know where they’re going, barreling down avenues, cell phone in hand. The secret is that they don’t, or rather they haven’t—until now. In fact, they may not actually be talking on those cell phones anymore, but instead using a relatively new service called HopStop, a MapQuest-like offering that uses mass transit and walking directions to get users from Point A to Point B in the five boroughs of New York.
By - June 2005 Issue, Posted Jun 02, 2005
German media giant Bertelsmann reportedly pumped $85 million into the beleaguered Napster between 2000 and 2002, before Napster finally declared bankruptcy and its remains were scooped up by Roxio. So what did Bertelsmann get for its $85 mil? The short answer is, nothing. However, Bertelsmann did get something from its dalliance with Napster: a profound respect for P2P technology and its potential for content distribution.
By - June 2005 Issue, Posted May 31, 2005
AvantGo, a service of the Sybase Inc. subsidiary iAnywhere Solutions, is moving fast in its efforts to push mobile content forward. The company beta launched the AvantGo Travel Tab at the end of May, with the specific intention of assisting its business traveler clientele. The project began last year when focus groups of business travelers around the world were asked how they use mobile technology and what they find important.
By - June 2005 Issue, Posted May 27, 2005
Thomson Gale, part of The Thomson Corporation, has announced the newest enhancement to Gale's Virtual Reference Library, the eBook Subcollection Manager. Thomson Gale has also announced new enhancements and additional entries to several of the company’s online databases including Thomson Gale’s Virtual Reference Library, Business & Company Resource Center, and Social Science Electronic Data Library.
Posted May 27, 2005
Local search technology, which has been growing in popularity, is all about bringing information about where you live into your search parameters. For example, you can find a doctor or a florist in your area, get their phone number, a map with directions, and in some cases, access reviews of the business.
By - May 2005 Issue, Posted May 16, 2005
It was not that long ago when PC users were pleading for decent consumer desktop search tools—software that provides a way to search your hard drive the same way you do the Internet. But with the exception of a few companies, nobody seemed to be heeding the call, not even the big names in Internet search: Google, MSN, and Yahoo!. Then suddenly last summer, that all changed, starting with Copernic’s release of a free desktop search tool. By the end of last year in flurry of releases, the big three followed with branded offerings. Others, including AOL and Ask, released tools as well. Some developed their own, while others purchased a solution or licensed one from another vendor. But in the course of a few months, we went from a sparsely populated desktop search marketplace to one crowded with solutions.
By - May 2005 Issue, Posted May 16, 2005
Recently there’s been an explosion of new developments related to finding and using visual and audio resources on the Web. Multimedia is definitely hot. While there have been some fee-based services that monitor and provide clips of television programming for corporations, such as ShadowTV and Critical TV, we’re seeing considerable activity in providing free access to multimedia content on the Web.
By - May 2005 Issue, Posted May 13, 2005
“Search,” as Steve Cohen, EVP and VP of products at Basis Technology, explains, “is made up of two stages: indexing and retrieval.” Monolingual search is relatively straightforward, but things get much more complex when you start offering search options in more than one language. Given that the Web is increasingly multilingual, the need for robust search options in a wide variety of languages is growing. As such, major search engines Google, Yahoo!, and MSN Search all offer multilingual search, to varying degrees. Google is the polyglot of the group, supporting more than 100 languages. MSN Search offers the fewest, but this may be due to its relative newness to the search game.
By - May 2005 Issue, Posted May 13, 2005
Podcasting has jumped onto the scene rather quickly, and its latest trick involves enabling subscribers to receive alerts when their favorite podcasters offer new files. Essentially, LiveMessage is “a broadcast application” for information alerts. “Alerts have been around for a long time,” says MessageCast CEO Royal Farros, “but the only mechanism for delivering alerts has been email.” And email, as Farros points out, is certainly not without problems, like its lack of authentication.
By - May 2005 Issue, Posted May 12, 2005
The definition of content management continues to expand, while content often remains fragmented throughout organizations. For years, the market moved steadily in the direction of a broader and broader definition of content management, seeking to encompass everything from assets and data to knowledge and intelligence and adopting adjectives like Enterprise and Total. According to FileNet, the content management landscape is set for another tectonic shift.
By - May 2005 Issue, Posted May 12, 2005
For more than a decade, European reliance on SmartCards—to secure financial transactions, authenticate cell phones, and more recently, to launch the ePassports initiative—has grown steadily. A SmartCard is essentially a little computer that, when put on a banking card, mobile phone, or other device, acts as a gatekeeper between the stored content and the outside world. Unlike the magnetic strips of credit cards that passively spit out data as they’re swiped, “the SmartCard chip plays a much more active part in the transaction,” says Chris Caruk, chief technologist and VP of marketing for Aspects Software. Today, as a result of work done by Aspects, SmartCards are poised to play a much bigger role in enabling the secure transfer of content in all its glorious forms.
By - May 2005 Issue, Posted May 10, 2005
What is most interesting about the rising tide of enterprise rich media use is how quickly companies incorporate audio and video into everyday business processes. Users are re-imagining multimedia’s functionality once it becomes as common and effortless a business tool as photo copiers and staplers.
By - May 2005 Issue, Posted May 10, 2005
The Health Record Network Foundation (HRN) has started a number of pilot programs to create a market for automated online health information. The goal is to create a voluntary online medical record system where patients can enter their medical history and allow access for their physicians or other medical providers. HRN’s first three pilot programs are with the Duke University School of Medicine (North Carolina), the state of Wyoming, and the Sunnybrook and Women’s College Health Sciences Centre in Toronto, Ontario. Brian Baum, CEO of HRN, says, “This idea means the consumer can start the process. They can go online anywhere, anytime, and initiate the creation of a personal health record, storing things like a family health history, medication list, allergies, who their clinical care team is—just basic information that’s within their control.”
By - May 2005 Issue, Posted May 05, 2005
With Ovum—an independent UK-based technology and research consultancy—forecasting mobile phone connections will hit the 2 billion mark next year, it’s no wonder content owners are scrambling to repurpose content for mobile device delivery.
By - May 2005 Issue, Posted May 04, 2005
In Part I of this series, Byrne looked at CMS interfaces and found that users tend to come to CMS projects with diverse expectations, so vendors often struggle to match their product out of the box to a prospective customer’s particular scenarios. In Part II, he examines CMS usability through the lens of system functionality. tony byrne
By - May 2005 Issue, Posted May 04, 2005
Images of tattered notebooks and blunt-tipped pencils are what many associate with budding writers. In fact, would-be screenwriters have been portrayed as doing just about anything to get their scripts to anyone even remotely involved in the film industry. Well, now there’s a new way: the process of getting your screenplay noticed has gone digital, too.
By - April 2005 Issue, Posted Apr 25, 2005
One of the advantages of living in the San Francisco Bay Area—a longtime hub of technological innovation—is the ability to attend events that add to one’s knowledge of the evolution of computer and Internet technology. Earlier this year, I was able to attend one of the Computer History Museum’s Speaker Series, which featured Steve Case, the founder and former CEO of America Online. The informal talk was led by Walt Mossberg, the Wall Street Journal’s Personal Technology columnist.
By - April 2005 Issue, Posted Apr 22, 2005
This article gives an overview of the various technologies through which end users can take advantage of the power of RSS feeds. It includes micro-reviews that highlight the pros and cons of a representative sample of RSS aggregation tools.
By - April 2005 Issue, Posted Apr 22, 2005
An international forum aimed at standardizing digital media and copy protection technologies is set to achieve a major milestone in its drive toward creating interoperable Digital Rights Management. This month, the International Digital Media Project (DMP)—which brings together more than 25 member companies across the digital content and device industries including Panasonic, Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Telecom Italia, and the BBC—is expected to release the industry’s first DRM technology specifications for Portable Audio and Video devices (PAVs).
By - April 2005 Issue, Posted Apr 20, 2005
At a time when anyone with a computer and a bit of Internet know-how can access an ever-expanding world of free content, you may wonder how fee-based content services survive. They are doing it through innovation and by finding ways to better aggregate, filter, and deliver content in ways that the free Internet does not offer.
By - April 2005 Issue, Posted Apr 18, 2005
Frode Hegland, a researcher at University College London (UCLiC), gives hyper new meaning. The native Norwegian, whose thought processes take tantalizing tangents to exponential extremes, wants to return to the one of the Web's founding principles: interactive information that actually informs.
By - April 2005 Issue, Posted Apr 14, 2005
Panels at the second annual New York McGraw–Hill Media Summit, held February 9 and 10, 2005, tackled topics ranging from mobile content to maintaining a loyal customer base to VC funding for entertainment and technology. One of the more lively panels faced the issue of DRM head-on, covering the changes in DRM over the past year, the state of DRM today, and an informed peek at the future of DRM.
By - April 2005 Issue, Posted Apr 11, 2005
Purveyors of digital content continue to seek the best ways to market and sell their materials while ensuring that only authorized parties access content. The trick is to find an end-to-end solution that lets customers use content in the ways they feel they should be allowed and at the same time, protect the rights of content providers.
By - April 2005 Issue, Posted Apr 11, 2005
Despite displays getting smaller, brighter, and more energy-efficient, they pale in comparison to the portability, readability, and feel of paper—still the medium of choice for the printed word. The electronic version of old faithful, epaper, may promise a new chapter in content delivery. geoff daily
By - March 2005 Issue, Posted Mar 31, 2005
The potential combination of Time Warner and Sprint, which was still only in the discussion phase as of January, has caused a great deal of speculation about how it would change the mobile content marketplace. Undoubtedly, the merger would further promote the “any time, any place,” content model, but it would also continue to concentrate the media market. This powerhouse partnership, if it were to come to pass, would give Time Warner and Sprint a so-called “quadruple play,” which would allow the partnership to offer a bundled package of high-speed Internet, television, long-distance, and wireless telecommunication services.
By - March 2005 Issue, Posted Mar 30, 2005
Nearly a decade ago, Margaret Bodde, co-executive director of the Film Foundation, began having a discussion with Martin Scorsese about how best to teach film to a broader audience than simply those studying film in college. "We started to see that if kids aren't introduced or exposed to films from the past, they'd have no motivation to protect them for the future," explains Bodde, so the Film Foundation was established with the express purposes of preserving film and educating the public.
By - March 2005 Issue, Posted Mar 28, 2005
A year ago I would have said that the XML-based RSS protocol is still way too geeky for mainstream users, but RSS is catching on at a remarkable rate. The question is, how will content companies profit from its popularity?
By - March 2005 Issue, Posted Mar 22, 2005
Singapore, long a central shipping hub for the distribution of physical goods throughout Asia, now wants to be Asia's hub for the distribution of digital goods, as well. To realize that goal, and to cash in on its telecommunications infrastructure investments, the Singapore government has formed a trade association called the Infocomm Development Authority of Singapore (IDA).
By - March 2005 Issue, Posted Mar 21, 2005
In the fee-based info world, this has been borne out by the increasing problem of information overload and the savvy content user’s preference for packaged content offerings that simplify the job at hand. The fact is that information is not a one-size-fits-all proposition. Different users have different needs and, importantly, different sized organizations have different budgets for that information. OneSource Information Services, long known for its high-end business information product, Business Browser, has moved into the small to medium business information strata with the introduction of OneSource Express.
By - March 2005 Issue, Posted Mar 18, 2005
Much of the impetus for examining CMS usability has come from systems users themselves, but as customer cries grow louder, vendors are examining the very meaning of usability. In this first of two articles, I’ll offer a general introduction to the problem of CMS usability with a focus on contributor interfaces.
By - March 2005 Issue, Posted Mar 17, 2005
Because the confusion of archiving and compliance is enough to defeat the most determined of executives, a group has come together to offer best practices and resources for companies struggling with email and IM compliance: the Electronic Communications Compliance Council, or TE3C. While the name may not roll off the tongue, it suggests the council’s approach to compliance action—take it slow.
By - March 2005 Issue, Posted Mar 15, 2005
As automotive entertainment and information options grow from your basic AM/FM radio and CD player to include GPS devices, backseat DVD players, satellite TV and radio, and even hard drives, the industry is on the lookout for content that appeals to drivers and passengers. With this potential for a near-captive audience at stake, the automotive market has just started to heat up.
By - January/February 2005 Issue, Posted Feb 24, 2005
Financial services—among the most regulated companies in the world—lag behind most other industries in implementing CMS, but those that are doing so are reaping benefits.
By - January/February 2005 Issue, Posted Feb 24, 2005
Legitimate email marketers have turned a wary eye towards a new proposal gaining momentum at the Federal Trade Commission that would award hard-cash bounties to ordinary citizens who help arrest the bane of email marketing today: spam.
January/February 2005 Issue, Posted Feb 23, 2005
Napster, KaZaA, and Gnutella have fuelled consumers’ passion for downloading and swapping MP3 music files—and BitTorrent and eDonkey are doing the same for video. Now, a handful of upstart vendors are poised to move peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing applications from the wired Internet to the wireless space to create an anywhere, anytime network for content creation and distribution.
By - January/February 2005 Issue, Posted Feb 22, 2005
Open source isn’t for everybody, but for a growing number of organizatons, taking the open road can lead to a customized CM solution.
By - January/February 2005 Issue, Posted Feb 18, 2005
It has taken nearly a decade for the vast majority of Web content to prove the old mantra that media money always follows the eyeballs, but it won’t take that long for Web logs to find reliable business models.
By - January/February 2005 Issue, Posted Feb 16, 2005
WiFi access has been cropping up in some unexpected places lately. While access at airports and other hubs of activity is useful, if not terribly surprising, WiFi is slowly making its way to more off-beat locales. New York has made Bryant Park and other public areas WiFi-enabled; Starbucks and retailers around the country provide access while you sip your latte, grab a burger, or make copies. The latest on the WiFi roadmap is the city of Tempe, Arizona. And you better believe that the state the Grand Canyon calls home is doing WiFi in a big way.
By - January/February 2005 Issue, Posted Feb 11, 2005
Revenue leakage, insufficient marketing, and inadequate mobile operator business infrastructure rank high among the issues holding back the development of mobile commerce in Europe, according to a September survey of major mobile content providers. The Mobile Content Providers Confidence Study, conducted by Qpass, a U.S.-based provider of mobile commerce software solutions, revealed that 85% of mobile content providers believe operators are “constrained by poor or inadequate systems for mobile commerce.” Moreover, 70% of content providers deemed this situation “unacceptable.”
By - November 2004 Issue, Posted Dec 10, 2004
The EContent team suggests some sites, projects, and resources that—while outside the scope of the EContent 100 list—are well worth taking a closer look at.
By - December 2004 Issue, Posted Nov 29, 2004
Companies are opting for elearning over more traditional learning due to the increasing mobility of the workforce, the need to save on training costs, greater acceptance of Web-based training, and better interoperability of system.
By - November 2004 Issue, Posted Nov 15, 2004
Mobile content was once considered mass market and low value, so primitive DRM solutions sufficed. Today, the distribution of rich multimedia content and an increasing amount of sensitive corporate content mandates a much more stringent approach to mobile DRM.
By - November 2004 Issue, Posted Nov 12, 2004
Over the last three years, mergers and acquisitions have become de rigueur in the ECM market as major players in the space strive to broaden the definition of enterprise content management, especially through the addition of digital asset capabilities. In 2001, Bulldog Group—a Canadian company that specialized in DAM—was acquired by Documentum. Interwoven signed an agreement in June of 2003 to acquire MediaBin. Less than two months later, in August of 2003, Stellent followed suit and purchased DAM vendor Ancept. Then in August of this year, Open Text announced its acquisition of Artesia Technologies.
By - November 2004 Issue, Posted Nov 04, 2004
"More, More, More, How Do You Like it?" Who knew that Andrea True’s disco lyrics would presage today’s digital information dichotomy? When you really need to know, quantity without quality just won’t do. Anybody using a search engine realizes that, unless you get a perfect hit on page one, too many results are a very bad thing. And if you are a researcher, the seemingly endless resources of the Web seem swell until you actually have to pull a needle of data out of a haystack of results.
By - November 2004 Issue, Posted Nov 03, 2004
Matrix Semiconductor, Inc. has introduced a low-cost, write-once flash memory chip called Matrix 3-D Memory (3DM) that could create an important new content delivery platform for devices such as cell phones, PDAs, and media players equipped with a memory card slot.
By - November 2004 Issue, Posted Nov 02, 2004
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