January/February 2008 Issue


News Features

Google’s recent surprise entry into social networking has kicked off a land rush that has developers scrambling for real-estate and first-mover status in a massive, largely untapped, and previously closed-off market.
By - Posted Jan 25, 2008
Sitecore, founded in 2001, is a San Rafael, Calif.-based company that provides web content management and portal software for organizations. This month, the company will add Foundry to its product offerings in order to address the needs of decentralized organizations.
By - Posted Feb 05, 2008
Recently, the European Commission announced its plans for the European Digital Library (EDL) to develop a prototype site, which will allow users to access digitized content from European archives. The first theme of the prototype, better known as the CITY, will be launched in November 2008.
By - Posted Feb 07, 2008
PersonalBrain, a product of TheBrain Technologies, links networks of information including ideas, concepts, files, and webpages in a manner that attempts to mimic the thought processes of each unique user.
By - Posted Jan 25, 2008

Featured Stories

It takes more than desire to move your business into other countries. Companies that successfully transition to world markets understand the cultural, legal, and linguistic differences across these different markets. Further, they build technology and content infrastructure to support a global presence.
By - Posted Jan 24, 2008
The art, science, and craft of typography are thousands of years old. Today, more than 550 years after Gutenberg, anybody with a personal computer can self-publish and anyone with an internet connection can be read by millions. But somewhere in the democratization of the displayed word, many of the traditional lessons of message and meaning have been forgotten.
By - Posted Jan 31, 2008
Companies eager to implement Web 2.0 for collaboration purposes in the enterprise, and those vendors with products to sell, will be better positioned to succeed by preparing themselves for the fundamental changes that these technologies will bring to their organizations.
By - Posted Feb 05, 2008

Columns

For those wishful thinkers who dream of corporate "knowledge management," few tools are more seductive than the enterprise wiki. In the idyllic wiki Web 2.0 future, all your mission-critical information will be easily accessible with a quick keyword search. What's wrong with this picture? We have plenty of evidence in its favor. Hasn't Wikipedia shown us all the way?
By - Posted Jan 25, 2008
Search engines are indisputably a potent way to generate value, but it may be recommendation engines, which encourage users to keep coming back for similar content, that actually pay the biggest dividends for content companies and publishers in the long term. In its basic form, recommendation technology—modeled on the approach of online bookseller Amazon—suggests content on the basis of what like-minded customers consume, connecting users with relevant content that their peers recommend. But the paradigm goes far beyond that to link consumers not only with content they like, but ultimately with users who share their interests and passions.
By - Posted Jan 29, 2008
As most traditional publishers are painfully aware, digitization has a tendency to commodify everything in its reach. Just think how much of the content we paid for a decade ago—from newspapers to premium video and audio content—is available now at no cost online. From news to business information, phone calls to software applications, the new model is giving away the store in the hopes of making a profit in some other way. Most text and video content relies on advertising to pay its way now, while service-based products, like web applications and digital calling, put some limitations on the free offering in order to upsell a richer version.
By - Posted Jan 29, 2008
A colleague recently pointed me to ResearchBuy.com, a market research aggregator that promotes its free, short industry profiles as well as access to off-the-shelf market research reports and customized research. What I initially found interesting was that it had a real Web 2.0 feel. The free industry reports are in the MarketWikis area of the website, and they are, in fact, in a wiki format, complete with discussion and edit tabs.
By - Posted Feb 05, 2008
As the web has made communicating with reporters and editors extremely easy, breaking through and getting a journalist’s attention using the email methods everyone else uses has become increasingly difficult. These days, anyone can find the email addresses of reporters in seconds, either through services that sell subscriptions to their databases of thousands of journalists or simply by using a search engine.
By - Posted Feb 01, 2008
Part of email's appeal from the start was its ability to link team members who didn’t have the luxury of sharing a space. In some cases, it was teams comprised of individuals throughout a university campus; in others, it was researchers located across the globe. There is also a characteristic that computer folk and academics share: a tendency to keep odd hours. Email helped with this. Much of early email was limited to internal-only mailbox systems that let team members leave messages for others to pick up and respond to whenever they happened to come in and boot up. So, between team playing and time shifting, what’s not to love? A whole lot.
By - Posted Jan 22, 2008

Faces of EContent

"Sometimes customer service is like walking a tightrope, due to the time difference."
By - Posted Jan 25, 2008

Case Studies

MWW Group turned to Socialtext to better manage projects, track news in real time, gather information updates, and ease communications for its own disparate workforce, as well with as clients around the world.
By - Posted Jan 24, 2008