December 2006 Issue


Featured Stories

Welcome to the sixth annual EContent 100—our list of companies that matter most in the digital content industry.
By - Posted Nov 15, 2006
The EContent team suggests some sites, projects, and resources that—while outside the scope of the EContent 100 list—are well worth a closer look.
By - Posted Nov 15, 2006
A collection of blogs EContent 100 team members hit (or write) on a regular basis. Click and learn.
By - Posted Jan 01, 2007
Get to know a bit about the twelve members of the EContent 100 judging team, the group of experts and industry watchers who formulated the 2006 list of companies that matter most in the digital content industry.
By - Posted Nov 15, 2006
This year we profile the 20 companies that generated the most banter among the EContent 100 Judging team during our month-long wiki-based judging process.
Posted Nov 15, 2006
Our list of the 100 companies that matter most in the digital content industry.
Posted Nov 15, 2006
Large mergers this year at the top of the content technologies marketplace have led some to opine that these markets are finally maturing. I’m not so sure. Large mergers this year at the top of the content technologies marketplace (IBM swallowing FileNet, Open Text buying Hummingbird, Autonomy taking Verity) have led some to opine that these markets are finally maturing. I’m not so sure.
By - Posted Nov 27, 2006
So who put the “e” in econtent? I’d like to meet this guy. When collections are digitized, why don’t we call it “econtent”? Instead, we talk about creating a “digital library.” The information industry has been busy making content digital for 30 years or so. Yet somehow the idea of turning print indexes into online databases or digitizing entire runs of scholarly journals so that they are full-text searchable just doesn’t capture the public’s attention. It’s only when we call it “econtent” that everyone gets all interested and excited.
By - Posted Nov 28, 2006

Columns

Perilous as it may seem, I will once again mark the EC100 issue with a look ahead to next year’s emerging revenue models, which we may well be calling old hat this time next year.
By - Posted Nov 15, 2006
Sometimes the pace of change scares even me, and I'm generally an early adopter. But today, while contemplating my navel and the state of the info pro universe, I realized that hip new trends in the info world go out of style faster than a Paris Hilton retrospective.
By - Posted Nov 23, 2006
In EContent’s 2005 year-end roundup of the Content Management System marketplace, I (amazingly) found 1,879 distinct CMS products listed in 20 directories around the world. I have received dozens of requests for my spreadsheet listing all the CMS tools and a second spreadsheet of their most common features, which is being developed as part of the CMSML project (a markup language to help describe and evaluate CMS capabilities).
By - Posted Nov 22, 2006
Access to simple tools empowers us to mix and mash, blog, and mesh. We create content on our terms and share the results with social networks we have chosen to join based on common interests and expertise. What’s more, the proliferation of social networks means we benefit from an abundance of choice.
By - Posted Nov 21, 2006
As we started 2006, I saw the “Clash of the Titans” metaphor as a way to view the struggle to dominate our content tools: Google and Microsoft were the titans, locked in mortal combat.
By - Posted Nov 30, 2006
As an intranet consultant, I certainly get to see the world— even if it means contending with severe security restrictions at Heathrow for a short four-day trip from London to Sydney. Luckily, the only major problem on that flight occurred at 25,000 feet and 100 miles out from Sydney, when it became clear that virtually no one on the 747 had a pen to complete the landing card. Whilst in Sydney, I had the chance to talk intranets with James Robertson, managing director of Step Two Designs. By about the third latte, we got around to intranet maturity.
By - Posted Nov 28, 2006
On the web, marketing and communications has shifted from the one-way, one-size-fits-all approach of TV advertising to delivering just-in-time and just-right content to consumers and internal audiences. Successful web marketers understand that online, content sells ideas. It brands an organization as worthy to do business with. Companies, non-profits, political campaigns, and rock bands are the new publishers, delivering ideas and stories just like traditional media companies--and RSS needs to be part of the publishing plan.
By - Posted Dec 05, 2006
A plane hit a building in New York. I saw it on the evening news. The evening news saw it on YouTube. Right in the middle of the broadcast, the anchors cut to a YouTube video of the tragic event. The audience is making the news these days.
By - Posted Nov 15, 2006