May 2006 Issue


News Features

Basis Technology recently announced an initiative to create the next generation of digital forensics products. Basis Technology specializes in multilingual information retrieval, focusing on the problem of searching, sorting, classifying, and organizing information in many different languages. The company’s clients include Google, Microsoft, MSN Search, Yahoo!, AOL, and numerous others.
By - Posted May 16, 2006
Most companies start small, hoping to attract a bigger clientele as they grow. ClearStory is trying a different approach with its recent launch of ActiveMedia Essentials, a hosted, browser-based digital assets management package that targets smaller companies and departments that want to manage their digital media assets with the same security and usability that the major companies have come to expect from ClearStory’s ActiveMedia Enterprise software.
By - Posted May 02, 2006
“The next generation was born digital,” according R.J. Pittman, CEO, president, director, and co-founder of Groxis, Inc., who gave the opening keynote at the 2006 annual NFAIS Conference in Philadelphia. The “next generation,” he describes, was raised communicating through cell phone, either voice or text messaging.
By - Posted Apr 21, 2006
Baffled by the difference between .3gp, .3gp2, .avi, .dv, .mpg, .mpg4, .mov .mqv, .wmv, .asf? Hung up on how to upload these pesky digital video formats into your business Web site, blog, eBay account, or online store? Unsure whether your format plays nice with your customers’ preferred players? Well, the mystifying business of publishing digital video content online just got a whole lot easier.
By - Posted May 01, 2006
The French minister of culture, Renaud Donnedieu de Vabres, has a growing controversy on his hands: the DADVSI law on copyright in the digital age. The most contentious aspect of the DADVSI law is the attempt to curb illegal downloading of music and movies via P2P programs through the use of Digital Rights Management (DRM). This has caused uproar amo486ng the Internet-using public and divided the governing political party representatives in the national assembly.
By - Posted Apr 25, 2006

Featured Stories

As digital asset collections grow, it becomes increasingly important to build a digital asset management system (DAM) with strong classification, taxonomy, and search components to help you locate an asset whenever you need it. Yet digital assets present a unique search problem, requiring a strategy all its own.
By - Posted May 02, 2006
The recent proliferation of blogs and other “consumer-generated media” has had a major impact on our culture—affecting the way we get our news, entertain ourselves, and especially the way we do business. These days, smart companies need to equip themselves to track their corporate image online.
By - Posted Apr 25, 2006
The infiltration of online communications technologies into the corporate training space has resulted in a new subset of elearning that promises quick, easy, and rich learning at lower costs. Now you don’t have to be rich (in money or technical skills) to create or benefit from rich learning.
By - Posted May 09, 2006

Columns

Communicating with target audiences through Web content initiatives is also an extremely cost-effective form of marketing. If you’ve got an hour or two a week to devote to it, a blog is virtually free to produce. Contrast that to, say, an expensive direct mail campaign. Other forms of marketing also take time to produce, but cost tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars to execute. As much as I rant about Web content as a viral marketing tool on the speaking circuit and riff about it on my blog, I’ve never had detailed insight into the specific metrics around one viral marketing effort using Web content—until now.
By - Posted May 09, 2006
Until I heard that preacher fart, I was never much of a believer in user-generated media. I don’t mean garden variety user-generated content (UGC), which embraces blogs, a few digital photo postings, and the endless scrolls of reader comments. I’ve always believed that community interaction is a more important part of the online mix than most traditional publishers admit. I’m talking about the more ambitious amateur media making, that vox populi revolution the Internet was supposed to spark. I was here in 1998 to see the crash and burn of so many attempts to organize garage bands and personal Webcam shows into populist big media rivals. The eternal democratic fantasy was that accessible digital media and free distribution would at long last unleash the people’s (always, the people’s) creativity in personal media-making.
By - Posted May 02, 2006
Up to the mid-’90s, managing content was easy. Records managers cataloged documents, locked them up, and when their retention period expired, destroyed them. The main threats were fire and water. Today, content comes in thousands of electronic formats, including email. Content’s central importance is attracting a new threat: patent litigators, the modern Willie Suttons, because—as Willie famously said about robbing banks—that’s where the money is.
By - Posted May 09, 2006
A few weeks ago, I received an invitation to provide consulting support to a professional association here in the UK as they went out to tender for a CMS. The document provided a very clear analysis of the requirements of the association, but then I came across a disquieting statement to the effect that the association was going to purchase a CMS for its Web site (including the provision of a shopping basket for publications and the opportunity for members to update their personal information) and that, at some time in the near future, it planned to migrate its intranet into the Web CMS.
By - Posted May 05, 2006
The announcement of the Sony eBook Reader, expected out this month, triggered a flurry of speculation about the ebook market. We at EContent aren’t immune: We wrote about its Japanese predecessor (LIBRIé), covered its CES debut, speculated on its potential impact on the ebook market, and are angling for a review unit (as is every other media outlet on the planet). Sure, I’m interested in any delivery mechanism for digital content and the opportunity it offers as another content outlet, but damn, the new Sony Reader is just so small and hot!
By - Posted Apr 28, 2006

Faces of EContent

“I make certain that we get a positive ROI.”
By - Posted May 02, 2006

Case Studies

Every month, PlayStation 2’s online network draws millions of users from across a wide range of demographics, ages, and cultural backgrounds. Once in the system, users generate their own screen names, input titles for their games, and can communicate with fellow players via text messaging. All this text is potentially visible to the entire online community, creating the need for a way to monitor these lines of text and filter out anything vulgar or that wouldn’t be considered family-friendly. SCEA turned to Teragram for its complex, multi-language filtering needs.
By - Posted May 16, 2006