May 2012 Issue


News Features

The explosion of nondesktop access points to information and the proliferation of apps has had-and is likely to continue to have-a significant impact on the way that users seek and access information. Historically, search engines have driven access to content with organizations such as Google leading the pack. The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project's "Search Engine Use 2012" report shows Google with a commanding lead-it's used by 83% of those searching online, compared with the next highest, Yahoo!, at just 6%.
Posted May 07, 2012

Featured Stories

In the traditional publishing model, an author with an idea would need to attract the attention of an agent or publisher who would evaluate the idea and the author's credentials and abilities in order to make a decision. Stories abound of frustrated authors who faced rounds of rejection before finding a home for their work-or simply giving up. Some of those rejected had truly brilliant insights and, ultimately, popular prose to offer. Notable among them are Stephen King, George Orwell, and J.K. Rowling.
By - Posted May 02, 2012
The digital media industry continues to evolve, in part because of the people who have devoted their time and expertise to advancing the technology and the content that it powers. When we asked industry experts who they felt were the 15 most influential people in digital media, we expected to receive a range of responses. And that's what we got.
By - Posted May 21, 2012
Virtually all online video platforms (OVPs) offer browser-based single or multiple file upload. More advanced features include the ability to compress before uploading, which is great when upload bandwidth is limited. Other convenience features include uploading from a drop folder, FTP-driven upload, and the ability to write to the OVP's application programming interface for automated upload from your content management system. You may also need a service that accepts mobile uploads.
By - Posted May 14, 2012

Columns

As we watch newspapers continue to struggle with the digital transformation, it's worth looking at another time in history when newspapers grappled with a disruptive technology. That's right, the introduction of the internet was not the first time newspapers were rocked by revolutionary upheaval. In the middle of the 19th century, as the telegraph started to take hold, newspapers initially saw it as a threat before coming to a realization: It could actually transform the industry. Sound familiar?
By - Posted May 08, 2012
Digital asset management (DAM) and web content management (WCM) have a long history together: the partners, the rivals, surviving the big divide between the two, and crashing in unison like two waves in the era of converging enterprise technologies.
By - Posted May 15, 2012
Within the next few years, the post-PC world of connected devices is going to have as profound an effect on the buying and selling of goods in this country as the internet has had in the last decade. The velocity with which people are embracing m-commerce and now t-commerce (tapping buy buttons on tablets) is surprising even the cheerleaders of mobile media. Publishers, watch this space. Having your content on handsets and tablets could position your company to be at that lucrative point of sale (POS) in a way never before possible, largely because now the POS can be anywhere inspiration hits.
By - Posted May 24, 2012
I refer a lot of consulting projects to my friends these days. But I also keep a few gigs for myself when they seem particularly interesting. These allow me to have a hand in answering pressing questions about digital media and entertainment for hedge funds, private equity groups, and film and TV studios-which means that I spend a lot of time pontificating. With a schedule that leads me to consume content in snack sizes, I thought it'd be fitting to point out some of the tidbits upon which recent media engagements have caused me to pontificate:
By - Posted May 29, 2012
I started making a lot of hiking plans earlier this spring. I'd adopted a dog in January and had been wandering in the woods almost every weekend since. Then a friend of mine emailed me and asked if I'd be interested in section-hiking parts of the Appalachian Trail-specifically the parts that run through Connecticut and Massachusetts. I'd visited a couple of the Connecticut sections last summer, so I was excited to hit some new spots, this time with the dog in tow.
By - Posted May 30, 2012

Faces of EContent

At FishBowl Worldwide Media, an independent production company that develops scripted television, unscripted television, and digital content, Kelly Nash is a manager in the unscripted television division. "I develop new television ideas on my own, and also meet with independent producers in the community who pitch me ideas," Nash says. "When I partner with a producer, we develop the format together as a 50/50 partnership." After putting together a presentation that includes a "sizzle reel" to provide a taste of the show and its characters, the team pitches it to television networks.
By - Posted May 16, 2012

Case Studies

The Martha Stewart Show needed to prepare for an upcoming fall season and wished to reengage viewers lost during the summer season reruns. So, The Martha Stewart Show turned to Facebook to reach out to its existing fans. In addition to reinvigorating and expanding the fan base, it sought to expand its mailing lists to promote the show as well as cross-promote its other diverse offerings. However, the company felt it needed more social marketing expertise and started looking outside of its offices for help.
By - Posted May 09, 2012