November 2011 Issue


News Features

With the online launch in October of The Legacy Project, an educational video series that features original interviews with Stephen Sondheim, Edward Albee, and eight other legends of American theater, the series' publisher, Alexander Street Press, contributed a substantial amount of new, firsthand documentation of the creative processes of these cultural icons to the historical record. But the fact that the collection is fully accessible through an online streaming platform is substantial in and of itself, and it says something significant about the current state of academic publishing and the direction in which the industry is headed.
By - Posted Nov 09, 2011
When the Pew Internet & American Life Project first measured gender differences in online social networking in 2005, only 9% of men and 6% of women who went online used social networking websites. Since then, millions more Americans have signed up on sites such as Facebook and LinkedIn. There has been another change in this statistical picture as well: For a few years now, women have been more likely than men to be online social networkers. According to the most recent Pew survey, from May of this year, 69% of women who are online use social networking sites, compared to 60% of men. Women also are more active on these sites; for example, 18% of women Facebook users update their statuses at least daily, compared to 11% of men.
By - Posted Nov 23, 2011

Featured Stories

Few, if any, would argue that the internet has dramatically and permanently changed the publishing industry. As print publishers have scrambled to find ways to compete with and, ultimately, embrace the digital world, some are excelling through a combination of traditional and online options. Others, new to publishing, are operating in the online-only world, but everyone is dealing with the age-old problem of circulation building and audience development.
By - Posted Nov 16, 2011
Somewhere between unknown, independent bloggers and traditional publishers with well-respected reputations are the sites known as content farms--websites that generate a large quantity of content specifically designed to rank high in search engine results. They range from local, content-driven sites such as AOL's Patch and Examiner.com to how-to sites such as Howcast and Demand Media's eHow.com to topic-focused sites such as Suite101 and Associated Content.
By - Posted Nov 30, 2011

Columns

I am fortunate. For the past 9 years I have run my own business, helping people by speaking around the world and writing about new marketing strategies. It's so amazing to me that I can earn my income by doing what I love.
By - Posted Nov 01, 2011
I assessed two competing digital paper products in the early '90s: Adobe Carousel (later renamed Acrobat) and Envoy. I settled on Acrobat, based on Adobe's deep expertise in print via PostScript. The idea of a timeless, reliable digital file format remains appealing today, especially when that format is ubiquitous, easy to create, search, and use (not to mention an ISO standard). Creating a PDF file from a properly styled word processing document, such as Microsoft Word, OpenOffice, or WordPerfect, gives you both print fidelity and automatic hyperlinking. You can be sure of a rendition faithful to the print version. Moreover, users on Windows, Mac, and UNIX platforms will see and use it the same way.
By - Posted Nov 08, 2011
You probably feel you have a good sense of the assets of your organization. You know how many employees you have because they are all in an HR database. You know the sales you made last month because they are all in a sales ledger database. You know how many items you have in stock because they are all in an ERP database. You know how many computers you have because they are all in an asset database. And at the end of the year, all these databases will be queried to produce the annual accounts.
By - Posted Nov 09, 2011
Let's face it. Most product support sucks. And, if yours doesn't, you're among the few organizations doing it right.What's the problem? Support has always been thought of as a necessary evil, something we must provide because it's expected, not because we value our customers and place a high value on providing exceedingly amazing experiences.
By - Posted Nov 22, 2011
I recently jumped on the Mad Men bandwagon. That Jon Hamm sure is handsome, and boy oh boy, did they smoke a lot. There's plenty to gawk at-and cringe at-on that show. The sexism. The debauchery. All those pregnant ladies hitting the bottle and smoking up a storm. As I watch--floating somewhere between awe and disgust--the goings-on of Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce have got me pondering the modern business of advertising.
By - Posted Nov 29, 2011

Faces of EContent

As the sole database administrator (DBA) for startup Perfect Market, which provides traffic and content optimization solutions for web publishers, Tracy Tan likes the dual nature of her role. "It's nice to play with data-when business users ask me questions I can retrieve the answers. But I also like table design, and I get to do that for both our operational database and data warehouse database."
By - Posted Nov 11, 2011

Case Studies

Thomson Reuters needed to find a way to streamline its data monitoring and collection processes so that they could increase productivity and improve the quality of the data that they brought in. Content operation groups within the organization had been searching hundreds of websites manually, an ad hoc and unmanaged routine that didn't easily allow the sharing of best practices between the groups. Not only was it time-consuming, but it also posed a risk of coming up with inaccurate and incomplete data.
By - Posted Nov 04, 2011