September 2005 Issue


News Features

While the market for business content remains strong, content providers are increasingly expanding their audience pool by offering wares in different packages and price points. Alacra’s announcement of its Alacra Store demonstrates an increasing trend of providing patrons with a variety of inroads to premium content.
By - Posted Aug 25, 2005
People buy luxury cars—at least in part—because they are aesthetically pleasing. The same motivation drives people to auto parts stores for spinners to go with essentials like new tires. 3B is attempting to capitalize on a similar premise with its new navigation tool. Currently free for download, the 3B.net browser is designed to mimic a shopping mall or town center in order to leverage one of the most fundamental human behaviors: window shopping.
By - Posted Sep 01, 2005
New Yorkers might be in a perpetual rush, but for cardholders at the New York Public Library, reading on the go just got easier. In June, the NYPL launched its eAudio program, making more than 700 popular, educational, and literary titles available for download through the library’s Web site. With authors ranging from Jane Austen to Dr. Phil, the size and variety of the audio book offerings make the NYPL’s eAudio program one of the largest of its kind.
By - Posted Aug 31, 2005
The April announcement of a planned Adobe/Macromedia merger left some content creators in a lather, fearing that it would, at worst, blunt competition and inflate price tags on vital publishing and Web development tools, or at best, result in the most successful product in each space being simply integrated by its former competitor.
By - Posted Sep 09, 2005
In July, RSS Investors, LP announced the creation of the first investment fund specializing in companies based on the Really Simple Syndication (RSS) family of standards and services. The fund, created by Jim Moore, John Palfrey, Richard Fishman, and Steve Smith and Tom Crowley (representing Ritchie Capital Management), will focus on supporting and nurturing the technologies and leaders who are championing RSS-related technologies, including news aggregation, blogs, and new classes of search engines.
By - Posted Sep 16, 2005

Featured Stories

Like most professions, the advent of digital content has affected the legal profession. It has changed the means and methods by which law firms, their clients, and the courts themselves must use, manage, and discover content.
By - Posted Sep 09, 2005
There are always myriad issues involved (from the technical to the philosophical) when it comes to moving content across disparate systems, but these problems come into glaring focus when the content includes confidential medical data.
By - Posted Sep 02, 2005
With the increasing globalization of business and the sharing of information among companies, customers, and suppliers in far-flung parts of the world, protecting confidential information, not only within an enterprise, but also once it leaves, has become paramount. Take a look at the DRM providers vying to protect enterprise content.
By - Posted Sep 16, 2005

Columns

How did an IP squabble lead to the first podcast? And why did Jenny Attiyeh quit radio and TV to create her own show on the Web? Well, it all began with the third international Open Source Content Management (OSCOM) conference at Harvard University's Berkman Center for Internet and Society in the spring of 2003. Dave Winer, the creative genius and enfant terrible of the blogosphere, was invited to give the keynote address to a couple hundred OS CMS developers from all over the world. As the architect of several Web standards like XML-RPC, SOAP, and RSS, Winer garnered enormous respect from his developer audience.
By - Posted Sep 07, 2005
The people who underwrite content (a.k.a. media buyers) speak about audience and media “fragmentation” as if it were nuclear proliferation, an insidious third world plot that needs to be contained or outsmarted. As eyeballs scatter to on-demand sources (DVRs, VOD, RSS, podcasts) and user-generated niches (blogs, social networking) the big question becomes how to “re-aggregate” these audiences with things like blog\pod\RSS ad networks that blast the same old message into these dispersed archipelagos of interest. The answer is...
By - Posted Sep 12, 2005
Whenever I give a workshop or presentation, I ask the people attending to raise their hands if Google is their default search engine. I am always somewhat surprised that at least 80% of the audience still start their search with Google, although it is heartening to see that at least half of librarians and info pros say they routinely use more than one search engine. (And, for the record, my default search engine this week is Yahoo!, although I use Firefox’s pull-down menu to change my toolbar default search engine regularly.)
By - Posted Aug 16, 2005
At EContent magazine, we adhere to a strict separation of church and state. I think most reputable magazines do, but in trade publishing it is particularly challenging—and important—to maintain editorial integrity while balancing the interests of the vendors, who are both readers and potential advertisers. Despite this separation, I find myself with plenty of sales issues to think about. I’m not hawking ad pages or subscriptions, but many editors are concerned with the salability of their product in both of these arenas; it is our primary objective to fill pages with quality content that will attract readers—both for subscription revenue and to offer advertisers a desirable audience.
By - Posted Aug 24, 2005
With my new book Cashing In With Content: How Innovative Marketers Use Digital Information to Turn Browsers Into Buyers soon to be released, I decided to check out the book’s new Amazon.com page. Well (I thought), as long as I’m here, I might as well click my name on the author link and pay a long-overdue visit to my first book, Eyeball Wars: a novel of dot-com intrigue. OK I admit it: I was deeply into a therapeutic session of vanity searching. Heck (I justified to myself) all I’m doing is listening in on a conference call. Being a multitasking sort of guy, I might as well poke around a bit while others are talking away.
By - Posted Sep 07, 2005

Faces of EContent

"Business people crave a little humor now and then."
By - Posted Sep 01, 2005