April 2005 Issue


News Features

Panels at the second annual New York McGraw–Hill Media Summit, held February 9 and 10, 2005, tackled topics ranging from mobile content to maintaining a loyal customer base to VC funding for entertainment and technology. One of the more lively panels faced the issue of DRM head-on, covering the changes in DRM over the past year, the state of DRM today, and an informed peek at the future of DRM.
By - Posted Apr 11, 2005
One of the advantages of living in the San Francisco Bay Area—a longtime hub of technological innovation—is the ability to attend events that add to one’s knowledge of the evolution of computer and Internet technology. Earlier this year, I was able to attend one of the Computer History Museum’s Speaker Series, which featured Steve Case, the founder and former CEO of America Online. The informal talk was led by Walt Mossberg, the Wall Street Journal’s Personal Technology columnist.
By - Posted Apr 22, 2005
Images of tattered notebooks and blunt-tipped pencils are what many associate with budding writers. In fact, would-be screenwriters have been portrayed as doing just about anything to get their scripts to anyone even remotely involved in the film industry. Well, now there’s a new way: the process of getting your screenplay noticed has gone digital, too.
By - Posted Apr 25, 2005
Frode Hegland, a researcher at University College London (UCLiC), gives hyper new meaning. The native Norwegian, whose thought processes take tantalizing tangents to exponential extremes, wants to return to the one of the Web's founding principles: interactive information that actually informs.
By - Posted Apr 14, 2005
An international forum aimed at standardizing digital media and copy protection technologies is set to achieve a major milestone in its drive toward creating interoperable Digital Rights Management. This month, the International Digital Media Project (DMP)—which brings together more than 25 member companies across the digital content and device industries including Panasonic, Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Telecom Italia, and the BBC—is expected to release the industry’s first DRM technology specifications for Portable Audio and Video devices (PAVs).
By - Posted Apr 20, 2005

Featured Stories

Purveyors of digital content continue to seek the best ways to market and sell their materials while ensuring that only authorized parties access content. The trick is to find an end-to-end solution that lets customers use content in the ways they feel they should be allowed and at the same time, protect the rights of content providers.
By - Posted Apr 11, 2005
At a time when anyone with a computer and a bit of Internet know-how can access an ever-expanding world of free content, you may wonder how fee-based content services survive. They are doing it through innovation and by finding ways to better aggregate, filter, and deliver content in ways that the free Internet does not offer.
By - Posted Apr 18, 2005
This article gives an overview of the various technologies through which end users can take advantage of the power of RSS feeds. It includes micro-reviews that highlight the pros and cons of a representative sample of RSS aggregation tools.
By - Posted Apr 22, 2005

Columns

I am a frequent conference speaker, and preparation is always a challenge because I know that most of the attendees at my sessions are experienced information professionals; I want to tell them something they do not already know. For a change of pace, I recently gave a series of workshops to groups of people within a variety of organizations who use the Web as part of their work, but who are not information professionals or Web researchers. From their questions and comments, and from watching them do hands-on searching afterward, I was reminded once again of some of the knowledge that we info pros take for granted.
By - Posted Apr 15, 2005
Let’s take the most lucrative sector of Web content during the last five years—search engines—and flip things around. Instead of using a search engine to sift through years of old data to find the piece you want, what if the data you need was searching for you? The concept of pushing timely, relevant information to a user is not new, of course. CBS MarketWatch and others have developed some excellent systems for notifying subscribers of breaking news, mainly through email and increasingly via RSS feeds for a kind of personalized wire service. Nevertheless, until now, most of these alert mechanisms have been brand-specific, limited to one delivery mechanism, or delivered only unwieldy gushers of headlines.
By - Posted Apr 18, 2005
As content management systems add functionality to serve the enterprise, one of the more important capabilities is digital rights management (DRM). For Web publishers with large content databases, how and whether they restrict access may be a life-or-death decision. If a company charges for content, its revenue stream is threatened by anyone duplicating its information.
By - Posted Apr 20, 2005
If Richard Nixon is history, then Eddie Haskell is nostalgia. With history, we factor in the complexity and context in which things take place, seeing the bad and good through the tempered eye of perspective. Nostalgia filters reality through a soft-focus lens with blemishes retouched, so that even our villains are charming, if disingenuously so.
By - Posted Apr 05, 2005
With consumers in control, the digital content industry is thriving. Today, businesspeople integrate information into daily work seamlessly, salespeople see news about customers when they’re ready to pick up the phone, and individuals control how they search and browse for content.
By - Posted Apr 12, 2005

Faces of EContent

“I look at how we can improve the process—and the information is the lifeblood of the process.”
By - Posted Apr 14, 2005