December 2009 Issue


Featured Stories

Our list of the 100 companies that matter most in the digital content industry.
Posted Nov 24, 2009
Learn more about the 2009-2010 EContent 100 Judging Team.
Posted Nov 24, 2009
The EContent team suggests some sites, projects, and resources that--while outside the scope of the EContent 100 list--are well-worth a closer look.
Posted Nov 24, 2009
A collection of blogs either authored by the EContent 100 judges or read by them on a regular basis—click and learn more about the digital content, media and publishing business.
Posted Nov 24, 2009
Welcome to the ninth annual EContent 100—our list of companies that matter most in the digital content industry.
Posted Nov 24, 2009

Columns

I have good news and bad news about the information industry, both in the same statement: For decades, industry growth has been stable and steady. It's typically a 5% growth rate per year, and it always has been. It varies slightly, but overall, the industry is predictable and, like a grandfather's sweater, comfortable. Unfortunately, this sweater is showing some wear.
By - Posted Nov 24, 2009
At the Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA), we maintain a constant dialogue with our members to ensure that we address their needs. To help us plan our activities and events in 2010, we conducted a web-based poll of members and nonmembers to determine the critical issues industry executives want us to focus on.
By - Posted Nov 24, 2009
In Gilbane's 20-plus years of covering content technologies, we have consistently found that global companies succeed when they treat content management as a business practice-not as a technology, but as a formalized, institutionalized business practice tied to strategic business goals and objectives. Leading practitioners recognize the value of content as an enterprise asset, and they proactively manage their content as the asset it is. Their content management practices are designed to drive costs out of value creation while delivering scalability that's critical to the ability to capitalize on business opportunity.
By - Posted Nov 24, 2009
After reaching a high of 872 deals valued at $104.4 billion in 2007, M&A for the media and information industry dropped significantly in 2008 to 758 deals valued at $33.3 billion, marking a 70% year-over-year decline in overall deal value.
By - Posted Nov 24, 2009
After a whirlwind of economic adjustments in 2009, publishers and content technology companies are hoping that the belt-tightening that they have undertaken this year will set the stage for renewed health in 2010. While there are polls and forecasts that seem to bear out these expectations, there are many unknowns that may lead to unpleasant surprises and challenging environments next year.
By - Posted Nov 24, 2009
These are interesting times for the publishing industry. Newspapers are shuddering after watching their classified ad revenue disappear, their subscribers die off, and their readers migrate to news content that is more current than the morning edition. Editors complain bitterly about the public's apparent preference for unverified crowdsourcing and (even worse) blogs over professional journalism.
Posted Nov 24, 2009
In my annual review of XML, two events or trends stand out: First is the Aug. 23 injunction by U.S. District Judge Leonard Davis of East Texas against Microsoft (MS) selling Word products "that have the capability of opening a .XML, .DOCX, or .DOCM file (‘an XML file') containing custom XML." Secondly, there is eXtensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL) and tools emerging to leverage it.
By - Posted Nov 24, 2009
In September, Adobe Systems, Inc. shook up more than one marketplace when it announced its acquisition of web analytics vendor Omniture, Inc.
By - Posted Nov 24, 2009
Let's not pull any punches: It's been a horrible year for newspapers. We've watched as one newspaper after another has closed down or gone to a limited online-only model. Newspapers are suddenly frantic to find a way to make money online, as though the commercial web is something that came along last month instead of 15 years ago.
By - Posted Nov 24, 2009
After chairing or otherwise participating in more than 20 conferences and workshops across Europe this year-the vast majority of which focused on hot trends in mobile content-I see a subtle yet seismic shift in the way publishers perceive and promote digital assets.
By - Posted Nov 24, 2009
I'm constantly fascinated by how the world of online content and social media allows organizations of all types to communicate effectively. It doesn't matter what industry you're in-B2B information, consumer ecommerce, music, nonprofit, or government-we can all learn from the smart marketing happening all around us.
By - Posted Nov 24, 2009
That pressure that you digital media managers are feeling in your right shoulder about now ... that is your publisher leaning hard on you to recover the revenue the company just lost everywhere else.
By - Posted Nov 24, 2009
The importance of providing effective search is being recognized at last. Almost every intranet strategy project has had a substantial search element to it, and I've worked on several in which search has been the primary focus. There are always risks when extrapolating from a few projects and a few more conversations, but I see some trends emerging.
By - Posted Nov 24, 2009
The EContent 100 judging team is a busy crew. Read their bios and you'll see that this is a group of people with some very demanding day jobs. For them to devote so much of their valuable time to compiling the list is remarkable. Certainly, it is their diversity and their deep day-to-day connection with the digital content industry that makes them qualified to undertake this task. Yet it does make the process even more challenging-as if trying to evaluate the merits of hundreds of companies weren't difficult enough.
By - Posted Nov 24, 2009