July 2001 Issue


Featured Stories

By - Posted Jul 01, 2001
Face this reality: many factors are conspiring to create growing enthusiasm for calling a close to the “all free, all the time” Internet era, which translates into a universe where pay per view makes sense. And it's a foregone conclusion that customers will pay for valuable content. Micropayment technology may finally get its day in the sun.
By - Posted Jul 01, 2001
Audio content—specifically, downloadable audio and dial-up voice browser applications--offers the promise of Web-based services from any smartphone or voice-enabled PDA. The dream of accessing the Web anytime, anywhere may actually soon be a reality.
By - Posted Jul 01, 2001
Vertical industry portals and marketplaces are built on the three Cs that are supposed to spell success for Web sites and their users: commerce, community, and content. But what type of content do they offer?It depends on the content/community/commerce mix, but all have their eyes on a future when the demand for emarketplace services is expected to grow significantly
By - Posted Jul 01, 2001
A funny thing happened on the way to the revolution in New Media. Content, which once enjoyed consensus status as King of Digital Media, came under increasing attack to the legitimacy of its crown. And since commodities cannot be King, the search is on for a replacement.
By - Posted Jul 01, 2001
Cross-media publishing, or repurposing, has been talked about ever since the exploding of the Web in the mid ’90s. But now, cross-media publishing has taken on a greater meaning, giving rise to two important concepts: Create One, Produce Many and the Content Master.
By - Posted Jul 01, 2001

Columns

If intranets are to be the primary platform for information and knowledge access within a company, attention must be paid to ensuring that intranets are managed by someone with the appropriate skills, experience, and level of authority.
By - Posted Jul 01, 2001
Unlike traditional publishing giants, especially in newspapers, who got rich partially by underpaying their scribes, the Internet overpaid, perhaps grossly.
By - Posted Jul 01, 2001