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HarperCollins Publishers is in the midst of acquiring Thomas Nelson, Inc., a Christian publishing company. The deal is expected to be finalized by the end of the year; the amount of which has not been disclosed. Thomas Nelson bundles free digital and audio editions with the purchase of any print book.

Posted Nov 01, 2011

Social media, tablets, and eReaders have not only changed the publishing model, they have given authors and publishers a whole new avenue to engage readers beyond books. Now, with the launch of interactive websites that accompany these books, such as J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter experience, Pottermore, and the continued growth and acceptance of mobile apps, the list of digital possibilities is getting longer.

Posted Oct 31, 2011

UK-based social reading site, Anobii is now making it possible for users to buy books directly from the site. Already backed by HMV, HarperCollins UK, Penguin UK and Random House UK, Anobii recently signed with 10 publishers to allow its users to buy through the site. By the end of this month, Anobii will be able to sell e-books from participating publishers which include Penguin, Random House and HarperCollins, along with Hachette, Pan Macmillan, Bloomsbury, Canongate, Faber, Wiley and Harlequin UK.

Posted Oct 28, 2011

HighWire Press partnered with TEMIS S.A. to integrate TEMIS' Luxid software within HighWire's ePublishing Platform. The solution is intended to provide automated content annotation, enrichment, and linking to HighWire's customers. The integration is expected to accelerate product development and time-to-market for both web and mobile.

Posted Oct 27, 2011

The Star Tribune, Minnesota's largest newspaper, will launch a metered paywall on its site Nov. 1. Under the paywall, readers who do not subscribe to the print paper will have to pay 99 cents per week to access more than 20 articles a month. Regular print subscribers have free access to the full site, mobile site, and apps.

Posted Oct 27, 2011

Amazon's Kindle Fire, releasing November 15th, is setting more than a little spark in the world of mobile devices. The original Kindle was a dedicated ereader but with Fire, Amazon is moving squarely into tablet territory. And it's a good thing too!

Posted Oct 27, 2011

Condé Nast announced increases in new subscription sales across the nine digital editions it offers on Apple's Newsstand. The iOS 5 Newsstand feature for magazine and newspaper apps has only been live for 2 weeks, and yet Condé Nast reports subscription sales are up 268% in comparison with the 8 weeks prior to the Newsstand launch.

Posted Oct 26, 2011

A new social reading app called Subtext launched for the iPad. As reported on MediaBistro, users of the free app can read ebooks and discuss them with a network of friends within the pages of the ebook itself. Readers can add comments and links and participate in discussions as they would on other social networking sites, such as Facebook

Posted Oct 26, 2011

WikiLeaks suspended operations due to a financial blockade that has cut off 95% of its revenue, according to Slate. Co-founder Julian Assange announced that if the blockade continues, WikiLeaks will be unable to continue operations into next year, and said WikiLeaks will now focus on fundraising efforts to maintain cash flow.

Posted Oct 26, 2011

As the journalism industry continues to face declining readership, newspapers such as the St. Petersburg Times are relying on websites to engage readers. While Tampabay.com has been up and running for years, it had never really taken advantage of Search Engine Optimization (SEO) to grow its traffic. When it decided to start taking baby steps with SEO, link building, and social networking, Tampabay.com had some early successes, but it quickly realized that in order to reach its full potential, it would have to develop a much more organized and holistic SEO approach.

Posted Oct 21, 2011

It seems baffling to me that in 2011 there are media companies that are still so clueless about the realities of digital publishing. In fact, many act surprised, as though it's something new that just dropped into their laps rather than a transition that's been happening over the past decade.

Posted Oct 17, 2011

When considering the future of web content management (WCM), it is perhaps helpful to remember that the technology is designed to systemize and automate that which has long been practiced by retailers and expected by consumers in the real world. Just as a shopper who enters a sporting goods store and asks for help finding a fishing rod might beat a hasty retreat if the clerk brings back a soccer ball, visitors to websites expect to be listened to and to receive personalized service. When you figure that an online shopper is not a car drive away from another store but rather just a few quick keyboard strokes away from another website, the pressure to get WCM right mounts exponentially.

Posted Sep 21, 2011

Tablet devices have become increasingly popular with both adults and children, with about 15 million iPads sold in 2010 and Kindle being Amazon.com, Inc.'s top-selling product. When ebooks began to boom and etextbooks hit the market, HMH didn't want to get left behind its competitors. In May 2010, HMH began to conceptualize its first etextbook project. It needed to figure out a way to appropriately and effectively present traditional paperback textbooks in digital app form so that they would engage users.

Posted Aug 26, 2011

For many years it seems, AOL has been a brand in search of a business model. For a time it appeared to be stockpiling journalists and properties in order to become a go-to destination for online journalism. But when the "AOL Way" memo leaked in February, it showed a far different picture.

Posted Jun 20, 2011

Between iPhones and other smartphones, Kindles and other ereaders, iPads and other tablets, PCs, and even traditional mainstays such as print and television, consumers are getting content from more sources than ever before. While this multitude of content sources offers new revenue streams, it also poses a challenge to publishers seeking to maximize the value of their content on as many mediums as possible. However, many publishers are going mobile and finding success.

Posted Jun 08, 2011

The content strategies of old media outlets are getting a complete overhaul: undergoing a little nip here and a tuck thereto meet users' expectations for instantaneous, scalable delivery to the devices and platforms of their choosing while stillproviding content worth viewing. Some companies find themselves stuck between old and new media silos, but according to Ron Miller, a freelance journalist covering the technology and media industries, the real solution lies in picking the best from both worlds--thoughtfully adapted content that provides additional context through new media devices and applications to create an innovative user experience.

Posted Apr 13, 2011

By the time the media industry caught up with the profound changes brought on by the World Wide Web, it was late in the game and they were forced to play catch-up with lean web-native startups that understand the delivery channel much better than they do. The main issue was (and remains) that traditional media companies viewed the web as a separate channel.

Posted Oct 15, 2010

For almost as long as there have been books, there have been authors trying to get their manuscripts in front of an acquisitions editor. Today, there are many roads that can lead writers to professional publication. While the destination is often the same, new routes are emerging all the time.

Posted Oct 13, 2010

Think about the last time you ran into a registration wall. How did you react? If you're like me, chances are you gave up and left. Yet newspapers and magazines are deluding themselves into thinking that pay walls will suddenly, magically be the solution to their revenue crisis this year. To put it mildly, I'm dubious about this scheme.

Posted May 03, 2010

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