Thomson Gale Introduces Digital Archive on Life and Works of Jorge Luis Borges; Launches The Making of the Modern Economy

Apr 12, 2005


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Thomson Gale, a part of The Thomson Corporation, has announced the launch of The Life and Works of Jorge Luis Borges: A Digital Database and The Making of the Modern Economy: The Goldsmiths'-Kress Collection of Economic Literature 1450-1850.

The information in The Life and Works of Jorge Luis Borges: A Digital Database originates from the Jorge Luis Borges Collection and Documentation Center of the Fundacion San Telmo -- a collection of materials related to Borges' life and works. The Life and Works of Jorge Luis Borges: A Digital Database provides access to a wide range of materials on Borges (1899-1986), including those that are rare or have appeared in unindexed national and provincial newspapers and journals. Subjects cover history, literature, philosophy, art, politics, linguistics, and culture. A major portion of the database includes the entire corpus of Borges' works - individual stories and poems. This digital archive provides a Spanish interface and features menus in both English and Spanish. It includes thousands of records with cross-references, allowing users to navigate among different resources.

Thomson Gale has also launched The Making of the Modern Economy: The Goldsmiths'-Kress Collection of Economic Literature 1450-1850, which is intended to offer new ways of understanding the emergence of modern economics and other social sciences. It is a collection for the study of early economic, political, business, and social history and for researching the literature of economics from this period. This online library offers witness to the theories, practices, and consequences of economic and business activity in the West, from the last half of the 15th century to the mid-19th century. It combines the strengths of the Goldsmiths' Library of Economic Literature at the University of London Library and the Kress Library of Business and Economics at the Harvard University Graduate School of Business Administration, along with supplementary materials from the Seligman Collection in the Butler Library at Columbia University and from the libraries of Yale University.
(www.gale.com; www.thomson.com)