Social Media Drives Holiday Purchases

Dec 15, 2011


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Social media and marketing agency Mr Youth, LLC found that social media users are more influential, spend more money on holiday gifts, and are more likely to recommend holiday gifts to others. The agency reports that 66% of social media users made a Black Friday or Cyber Monday purchase directly resulting from an interaction with a brand or with friends and family via social media.

The survey found that 86% of social media users made or received a recommendation about holiday gifts. Recommendations made by social media users were twice as likely to lead to a gift purchase as those by non-users, and ultimately 65% of recommendations led to a purchase. Mr Youth also found that brands generally respond to only half of users' posts on their pages, but found that 80% of users who received a response ended up making a purchase.

An infographic detailing all of the results can be found here.

(www.mryouth.com)


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