Publishing Profitability Survey Shows Publishers Out of Touch with Data

May 12, 2014


      Bookmark and Share

Publishers have surprisingly little knowledge of which and how mhing any third-party companies - such as Google, advertising vendors, and others - are accessing and profiting from their user and audience data. The Cxense Publishing Profitability Survey, a survey of more than 380 qualified US publishing executives, conducted in conjunction with Editor and Publisher magazine, showed that nearly 80% of respondents simply do not know who accesses their audience data. The survey results were released at the International News Media Association (INMA) World Congress by Cxense.

Of publishers that understand which third-party companies access their data, more than 20% acknowledged that the third parties are "likely earning more money from our data than we are." Nearly 70% of the respondents said sites like Google, Yahoo, and Facebook that pull content from their site and use their data are "frenemies," while 16% of respondents consider them enemies.

The survey also showed that readers are accessing publishers' content via mobile phones more often than through print, tablet devices, or personal computers. In fact, 34% ranked print as the least important means for readers to access content.

Other key survey statistics:

  • 78% of publishers admit to having no knowledge of which and how many third-party companies are accessing their user/audience data
  • 34% of publishers don't think ad revenues willeversurpass the all-time high of 2005; 60% think it will take 2-10 years to exceed that level
  • 89% of publishers expect their company's digital revenues will grow during the next 12 months, with ad sales ranking as the top reason why at 62%
  • 40% of respondents list smart phones as the most prominent platform for accessing content; 34% list print as the least prominent.
  • 47% of respondents currently have a paid digital subscription to a newspaper; 37% say they would consider paying for subscriptions while more than 15% said they would not consider a paid digital subscription.

(cxense.com)