LexisNexis Expands LexisNexisFile & Serve

Oct 10, 2006


      Bookmark and Share

LexisNexis U.S., a provider of information and litigation support technology and services, has expanded LexisNexisFile & Serve capabilities to provide attorneys with a site that will allow attorneys to execute paper filing, and to manage all of their filing, service, and service of process needs in one online location and via one vendor, regardless of jurisdiction and whether paper or electronic filing is required.

The new functionality is initially available in California for filings to any court in the state, service between law firms and service of process upon case parties or witnesses. File & Serve will extend the service to additional states in 2007. The new File & Serve capabilities will also be offered as part of LexisNexis Total Litigator--beginning with California courts. The broad jurisdictional coverage of the new offering means attorneys with cases in California courts may now upload documents to the File & Serve site and select delivery options such as same day or next-day courier delivery, next-day FedEx, or U.S. Mail. Additionally, File & Serve automatically arranges the appropriate filing or service method--electronic or paper--based on court rules and requirements to ensure attorneys are always in compliance with court orders. These functions are intended to minimize the risk of incurring fees or filing or serving past deadlines, while the overall increase in efficiency helps firms grow their business by minimizing time and expense spent on filing and service issues.

For paper filings, File & Serve Litigation Support Centers, located near courts, are staffed with experienced professionals who print and assemble filings in compliance with all applicable court rules and deliver them via LexisNexis courier the same day. In cases where efiling or eservice is required, File & Serve delivers documents electronically in compliance with court rules. Where electronic delivery is optional, attorneys have the choice of selecting the method they would like to use. As with electronic filing and service, firms charged a standardized transaction fee for each use for paper delivery.

(www.lexisnexis.com)