FatWire Software Releases Interactive Features for Web 2.0

Nov 17, 2006


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FatWire Software, a provider of content management solutions for deploying websites and applications, has released several new features that allow businesses to deliver Web 2.0 visitor experiences. Companies currently using FatWire Content Server can launch blogs, gather customer feedback, capture and share consumer-generated content, build online communities, and increase the frequency and relevancy of communication with customers.

FatWire's newest social computing modules include: blogs, where administrators can create new blogs by copying existing ones; blog owners can post new entries, review and approve comments; blog readers can write comments, browse by category, and search. All workflow, revision tracking, and publishing features can be leveraged in blog sites; forms, where business people can create form pages or add fields to existing pages for use in polls, surveys, customer feedback, registrations, product reviews, and customer testimonials. User-generated content can be captured and published to sites. Information provided by site visitors can be added to their profiles and used for personalizing the online experience during subsequent visits and interactions; tagging, where site visitors can assign tags to items for other visitors and themselves to find information; emails and landing pages, where marketers can design and send personalized email marketing campaigns to drive new traffic to their site, and to provide useful information and marketing offers to customers; non-technical people can use Content Server's InSite Templating feature to design and deploy campaign-specific landing pages to engage visitors who click through from emails, pay-per-click ads, banner ads, and those who respond to offline marketing vehicles. These new solution modules are available for download by FatWire customers, and will be included in Version 7.0 of FatWire Content Server, scheduled for release in early 2007.

(www.fatwire.com)