In Sites: EContent Suggests Some Top New Sites, Projects and Resources

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Paper.li

You follow people on Twitter for a reason: You want to know what they have to say. The user interface, though, isn’t for everyone. That’s where Paper.li comes in: It organizes links shared on Twitter into an easy-to-read newspaper-style format. Users can create a “paper” for any Twitter user, list, or hashtag.

These digital newspapers go a step beyond just aggregating links. This service also extracts all the information found in these shared links, including articles as well as videos and photos. Paper.li analyzes the content and places it into different sections, creating an organized, easy-to-read product. Newspapers are created every 24 hours, at the same time every day—the time you originally created the paper. Perhaps the best part, though, is that you don’t have to be a Twitter user to create your own paper. If you know which users, topics, or hashtags you’re interested in, you can follow them through Paper.li without ever having to join Twitter yourself.

Paper.li is the brainchild of SmallRivers, a privately held startup based in Switzerland and co-founded by Edouard Lambelet and Iskander Pols. The company’s site says it is “focused on facilitating the discovery of relevant content and other people of interest on the web.” The company is also focused on developing Paper.li, which it says is its most promising venture.

(paper.li)

Longform.org

Long-form journalism has not always translated well on the web. Short, snappy blog posts were the norm for a while, but these days, we’re down to 140-character microblogging. However, with unlimited space, it would seem that there should be a place for good long-form stories on the web. One site is pulling together some of the best examples for those of you who still love a good (long) story.

Longform.org posts articles the editors, Aaron Lammer and Max Linsky, think are good examples of long-form web journalism. Readers can follow links to stories from all over the country—and the world—or they can sign up for Instapaper and then click the “Read Later” button on Longform.org stories, saving them for later. Instapaper will automatically update your iPhone, iPad, Kindle, web browser, or other device. Users can then read the stories at their leisure, even without access to the web or to cell service.

Users also have the opportunity to suggest articles they find and think should be included on Longform.org. While the editors do not promise that all suggestions will be posted on the site, they do promise to look at each one for consideration.

(longform.org)

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