Features

Most Americans have at least a general understanding of the atrocities of slavery, but that knowledge likely comes from middle school history class, the media, and works from historical figures such as Frederick Douglass. One aspect many are not aware of is how geographically widespread slavery was and how it extended far beyond the small set of Confederate states all the way to the golden state of California.
By - June 2004 Issue, Posted Jun 07, 2004
A serendipitous result of the vast amount of information now available on the Internet is that it can be sifted and used by organizations for the betterment of the general population. While some of the health conscious may surf for nutritional data or new exercises, the possible impact of widespread access to this type of information extends far beyond, to diseases that are mysterious, life altering, and—thus far—incurable.
By - June 2004 Issue, Posted Jun 04, 2004
What we think we know about digital asset management and collaboration by teams using rich media assets constantly changes. Today the process differs from only a few years ago due to modern work habits, the economic downturn, and the increased use of outsourced service providers to manage and contribute broadly to projects.
By - June 2004 Issue, Posted Jun 04, 2004
Later this year, Adobe plans release a series of new 2D barcode technology products dubbed the Intelligent Document Platform. The product line, which was beta released at the March AIIM On Demand show, is aimed at government and enterprise users who have to process a mix of online and offline forms.
By - June 2004 Issue, Posted Jun 01, 2004
As the portal market matures, users are looking at more innovative ways to combine external content with their internal systems, and recent and emerging standards just may make the process easier for portal providers and customers alike.
By - May 2004 Issue, Posted May 17, 2004
When you think about it, a Web site’s primary purpose is to provide content to visitors, but the real trick is presenting the most relevant content for any given visitor at any particular moment in time. While the objective may be clear, the process of generating dynamic content isn’t.
By - May 2004 Issue, Posted May 12, 2004
Most companies rely on several team members to create documents or employ a review process where a file passes through a potentially labyrinthine approval hierarchy. While word processing tools have eliminated issues like trying to read a colleague’s indecipherable handwriting or epic retyping projects, they come with their own shortcomings. Add to the process the advantages and limitations of email and the need to ensure that workers can use familiar office software in secure, accurate, efficient, and traceable ways becomes increasingly important.
By - May 2004 Issue, Posted May 12, 2004
Nintendo’s Gameboy has been strengthening kids’ thumb muscles since its introduction over a decade ago. But those countless hours of button smashing were invariably spent doing one thing: playing games.
By - May 2004 Issue, Posted May 10, 2004
On May 1st, 10 countries joined the European Union’s existing 15 members, increasing the EU’s GDP by 5% to W 9.6 trillion, its population by 20% to 454 million, and its official languages by 82% from 11 to 20.
By - May 2004 Issue, Posted May 06, 2004
While all enterprise-level IT projects prove to be difficult and risky undertakings, a deeper examination of the ECM challenge in particular will reveal an endemic inattention to its critical corollary: the need for Enterprise Information Architecture.
By - May 2004 Issue, Posted May 05, 2004
In 1990, before the World Wide Web played a role in the lives of the general public, the Library of Congress (LoC) set out to build a digital library.
By - May 2004 Issue, Posted May 03, 2004
In stark contrast to last year’s show, when economic concerns (and terrible weather) kept people away, this year’s AIIM On Demand Conference and Expo, held in New York City March 8-10, featured crowded hallways and standing room-only attendance at many vendor presentations.
By - May 2004 Issue, Posted May 01, 2004
In the world of content management, the road to bliss can only be found when content flows efficiently, with nothing hindering it on its path to usefulness. While content management can function to keep businesses healthy and profitable, unstructured information has the potential to weigh companies down in content chaos.
By - April 2004 Issue, Posted Apr 23, 2004
According to many publishers large and small, the contextual ad programs set up by the major search engines and some other ad networks are spreading ad revenue wealth generously. But will it last?
By - April 2004 Issue, Posted Apr 19, 2004
Who wants to read a whale of a book like Moby Dick on a minnow of a display like a PDA? So instead of fighting this fact of life, a new, yet not so new, technology has risen to the challenge: epaper.
By - April 2004 Issue, Posted Apr 13, 2004
In an effort to simplify the searching process and bring more meaning and context to the results, a number of search engines and tools have been developed over the last several years that present a visual map of the results, rather than a text list.
By - April 2004 Issue, Posted Apr 07, 2004
Companies everywhere are trying to conjure the magic formula that will miraculously transform their corporate intranet from being just another place to find the company phone list to its rightful role as the lifeblood of corporate communications. Intranets.com has developed a philosophy to coincide.
By - April 2004 Issue, Posted Apr 01, 2004
Two companies have recently entered the scene with the intent to turn your musical affinities into recommendations for other titles, albums, and artists, and, not only could it revolutionize the way consumers find music, but it has implications in a host of other consumer arenas.
By - April 2004 Issue, Posted Mar 31, 2004
Safari Books Online, a joint venture between technology book publishing giants O’Reilly and Pearson Technologies, has managed to succeed in the ebook market where so many others have failed.
By - April 2004 Issue, Posted Mar 15, 2004
The brain may hunger for content, but employees and internet users—despite more information available than ever before—are malnourished, starving for the right informational diet, and many are looking to Web-enabled initiatives like portals for sustenance.
By , - March 2004 Issue, Posted Mar 15, 2004
The academic world has been particularly traumatized by the rising costs of the traditional publishing paradigm. Every university and college is constrained by these challenges, but few have attempted to reinvent the wheel. The University of California is one of those few.
By - March 2004 Issue, Posted Mar 10, 2004
If you need something done right, sometimes you have to do it yourself. Such was the case for ContentGuard and their work in the DRM space.
By - March 2004 Issue, Posted Mar 10, 2004
Increasingly, companies embrace the extranet as a better way to communicate with partners faster and more consistently. But once internal content becomes available outside the firewall, security needs increase exponentially.
By - March 2004 Issue, Posted Mar 08, 2004
Today’s enterprise employees have more information at their fingertips than at any point in history. While this information can certainly help companies, how is an individual or even a large group able to keep up with the volume? One way may be with RSS.
By - March 2004 Issue, Posted Mar 08, 2004
NewsGator, makers of the NewsGator news aggregator, announced the release of version 2.0 in February, adding a slew of significant new features.
By - March 2004 Issue, Posted Mar 05, 2004
Twice, Apple has stared down the barrel of organized customer dissatisfaction and dissent given life through Internet-enabled technologies.
By - March 2004 Issue, Posted Mar 03, 2004
For most Americans, knowledge of nautical weather patterns is cursory or anecdotal at best, but for those whose livelihoods and lives depend on understanding the ocean’s every move, technological advances have made the waters of the Gulf of Maine safer and more predictable than ever.
By - January/February 2004 Issue, Posted Feb 09, 2004
It’s easy to understand that when multiple users try to create, share, analyze, and store data, problems can surely escalate. Hence the evolution of content analysis tools, designed to meet the challenges of handling and understanding the use of information found not only on public Web sites, but also company intranets, extranets, and portals.
By - January/February 2004 Issue, Posted Feb 09, 2004
In April of 2003, EContent reported on the strides Mirror Image had taken in moving beyond content delivery, Web computing, and streaming, towards offering a complete end-to-end package to its Global 2000 customers. January brings a major announcement as the company unveils its new positioning as an “adaptive network for smart content,” whereby it bundles content management and content delivery solutions and makes aggressive moves into application and transaction support.
By - January/February 2004 Issue, Posted Feb 06, 2004
For better or worse, publishers choosing an ejournal hosting provider today have many options and capabilities to choose from that weren’t available in the first generation. The rapidly changing landscape also means that publishers should reassess their ejournal delivery method to evaluate new opportunities every two to three years. The need to address rising user expectations, continual technological developments, and powerful new standards means every econtent provider in the library market can gain insights directed to journal publishers.
Take a look at three content management scenarios in vertical markets that each has unique needs in order to help make a decision about the content management solution that will be right for your organization.
By - January/February 2004 Issue, Posted Feb 02, 2004
Imagine a digital content-commerce environment where buying and selling the rights to a game, song, or ring tone is as easy as buying a newspaper. That is exactly the goal of Navio, a digital commerce service provider that launched a brandable version of its primary customer interface this month.
By - January/February 2004 Issue, Posted Jan 30, 2004
The entertainment industry has been plagued with problems since the advent of digital distribution, but there are industry leaders trying to propose a new way of doing things; the founder of the Moving Pictures Experts Group (MPEG), Leonardo Chiariglione, founded a new organization, the Digital Media Project (DMP), to do just that.
By - January/February 2004 Issue, Posted Jan 30, 2004
The EContent team suggests some sites, projects, and resources that - while outside the scope of the EContent 100 list - are well worth taking a closer look at.
By - December 2003 Issue, Posted Dec 19, 2003
Drawing from a data archive of nearly one billion proper names used worldwide, LAS software uses patent-pending technology to identify names by culture and confidence factor both for its core government market and for general business intelligence usage.
By - November 2003 Issue, Posted Nov 20, 2003
A great deal of business content is unstructured information or, even harder to pin down, it’s somewhere out on the World Wide Web waiting to be found. There exists a range of business intelligence software available to help companies use this information to run their businesses more efficiently.
By - November 2003 Issue, Posted Nov 12, 2003
Digital content storage is big and dumb. To effectively do more than sit and store, it requires layers of complexity on top of its simple archival core. But the evolution of digital content has changed our expectations: We don’t just want to keep content, we want to access it, collaborate on it, and re-use it. Thus, stuffing assets away in some big box won’t do and if getting to it has to be a high-level IT function, then what happens to the goals of building a broader user base?
By - November 2003 Issue, Posted Nov 12, 2003
In 2001, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) approved seven new top-level domains (TDLs) for Web addresses. Although these seven extensions provide some much needed elbow room on the Internet, they leave out a vast array of possible extensions that could serve some practical—if not legal or ethical, purposes—such as the .xxx extension for use by purveyors of adult content.
By - November 2003 Issue, Posted Nov 07, 2003
When it comes to a specific question, such as, “How does XML support taxonomy development and usage?” the answers that come forth can be far-flung, disparate, and confusing. The waters get muddied further if you tune into all the announcements from the vendors, industry groups, and analysts who have opinions about such matters.
By - November 2003 Issue, Posted Nov 03, 2003
Gale’s ambitious Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO) project currently consists of seven subject modules containing 150,000 works totaling approximately 33 million pages and will allow a plethora of works to be added digitally to the collections of libraries worldwide.
By - November 2003 Issue, Posted Nov 03, 2003
This was the year of steak—lean steak—and little unnecessary sizzle at the Seybold San Francisco 2003 conference held in early September. The Seybold Seminars management team—faced with contemporary economic realities in the IT industry and recognizing that past exhibitors needed at least as much bang for fewer show-budget buck—reinvented the event, implementing a modular, homogeneous booth design for all participants.
By - November 2003 Issue, Posted Oct 31, 2003
Until recently, weblogs were primarily the domain of a tightly knit community of personal bloggers offering their insight and opinions, but they are finding their way into the workplace as organizations begin to recognize their promise as an inexpensive way to communicate information about dynamic events.
By - October 2003 Issue, Posted Oct 20, 2003
Speedy communication is only one aspect of doing business in real time. Even more important: the ability for execs to find out what's going on under the hood in time to fix problems before they cause something important to blow up.
By - October 2003 Issue, Posted Oct 15, 2003
Libraries lead the way in pioneering many digital initiatives, but what the local library implements to manage its ejournal collection or even a more ambitious digital archiving project will rarely scale to enterprise proportions
By - October 2003 Issue, Posted Oct 14, 2003
"In two years, KM will be a subset of elearning. Or elearning will be a subset of KM." That Gartner prediction, cited in Rosenberg's book e-Learning, was made three years ago. Neither variation has come to pass. Instead, the interactions of the two fields continue to increase and there seems to be a widespread agreement that KM and elearning are converging.
By - October 2003 Issue, Posted Oct 13, 2003
Until recently, the publishing models in science, technology, and medicine—the STM market—have been twofold. You published your research results either in a journal sponsored by a professional association or in one produced by a for-profit company. Enter the Public Library of Science (PLoS).
By - October 2003 Issue, Posted Oct 10, 2003
To combat the ebb and flow of inforation from internal corporate computing networks, corporations, institutions, and organizations alike have, until now, protected their digital documents, multimedia, and code with perimeter-based systems, but there are a new crop of IRM tools that strive to ease the burder of manageing secure collaboration and allow for the flexibility that the corporate environment requires.
By - October 2003 Issue, Posted Oct 07, 2003
In an era when cyberterrorism is more than just a nuisance, the need to provide effective means to thwart such attacks is critical for today's leading businesses and universities, as well as the general public.
By - October 2003 Issue, Posted Oct 06, 2003
Where should the line between maintaining national security and infringing on personal freedoms be drawn? The Department of Defense has recently added some fuel to the fire in this perpetual debate.
By - October 2003 Issue, Posted Oct 01, 2003
Mobile needs to be free to take any shape in order to find and empower users when and where they need it. But by virtue of its malleable nature, mobile is difficult to grasp and as a result, content providers—already cautious from scars garnered during the wild and wooly dotcom days—aren’t so quick to chase what might seem like a PDA pipe dream.
By - August/September 2003 Issue, Posted Sep 22, 2003
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